#ShowsWeLove: Charmed Reboot

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I am the sun,

I am the air,

I am human and I need to be loved,

Just like everybody else….does.

I was obsessed with the Halliwell sisters as a kid. Originally airing in 1998, Charmed, was a fantasy-drama starring Shannen Doherty, Holly Marie Combs and Alyssa Milano. I am a huge Alyssa Milano fan and a show involving her and magic was exactly what I needed.


The show ran for eight years finally ending in 2006 after several battles against darkness and once each of the sisters was married with children. I was crushed to see the show end, but happy they buttoned it up so nicely.

Possible talks of a reboot, sent images of Wyatt and Chris


returning with children of their own, or perhaps even Phoebe and her children (as she was the only one to have a trio of girls) swirling into focus. Though as the CW began finalizing details about the shows reincarnation, all hopes I’ve had of seeing the Halliwell bloodline continue have been dashed.

Instead the headlines have been checkered with news of a new feminist twist, the Halliwell name being converted and the cast getting a new Hispanic twist. I was afraid that what we’d get was a watered down version of the original we loved. But the CW promised:

“This fierce, funny, feminist reboot of the original series centers on three sisters – Macy (Mantock), Mel (Diaz) and Madison (Jeffery) — in a college town who, after the tragic death of their mother, are stunned to discover they are witches. Soon this powerful threesome must stand together to fight the everyday and supernatural battles that all modern witches must face: from vanquishing powerful demons to toppling the patriarchy.”

No offense to the hardworking staff on this show but with the exception of adding a lesbian to the trio the concept seems very similar to the original Charmed. Madeleine


Mantock, Melonie Diaz and Sarah Jeffery have been cast as the new versions of the Halliwell sisters though their last name will no longer be Halliwell.

This will be the first television inception of Charmed since the show ended in 2006, but the series had been a comic book following it’s shows end which brought back Prue and


continued on the Halliwell bloodline. That series also ended in 2012 leaving a new breed of diehard Charmed fans.

Echoes of Prue, Phoebe and Piper are clearly visible in the recreations of the new sisters. The eldest sister, Macy, a veritable Prue clone is described as “practical, driven, and brilliant geneticist.” Also like Prue, her world is most affected by their witchy secret. Mel, the middle sister who also happens to be an outspoken activist and lesbian is very different than Piper (Like a Piper/Paige mix) and finally The youngest sister, Madison, played by Sarah Jeffery described as a “bubbly college freshman” who’s witch business occasionally muddles her sorority girl aspirations.

I’m not completely against it, but i’m a little worried that they’re going to ruin a classic. Hopefully, the show’s move to the CW as well as new writer’s will add to the franchise instead of staining it.


What are your thoughts on the reboot? Leave a comment Below!


You can keep up with me, Noel Bleu and Blu Moon Fiction on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, GoodReads and Pinterest, or Shoot me an email @ BluMoonFiction@gmail.com


What’s New Pussycat: Literacy Programs (Books Through Bars)

fb_img_1520964442251555898774.jpgI started Blu Moon Fiction in order to share my passion for books and writing. I’ve been fortunate to work with some pretty respectable charities in my time as a result, which has fostered my interests in starting a few of my own as well as supporting the ones I work with presently.

Every Tuesday between 7:30 and 9:30 pm a few kind souls gather together and send some books to individuals in need. Books Through Bars, an all-volunteer non-profit organization helps the community while striving to reverse the devastating effects that injustice and incarceration has on individuals, families and communities.

What interested me the most in this group was their book distribution programBooks Through Bars, sends free books and educational materials to prisoners in; Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, New York, Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia. The books are sent to anyone who asks, as long as their prison accepts books.

Books Through Bars also hosts Address This! an education and empowerment project providing innovative correspondence courses to individuals incarcerated in Pennsylvania. Address This! pays special attention to the participation of prisoners in address thissolitary confinement or maximum security, who often have little access to such educational options.

Through their community outreach, strives to educate the general public about prison issues. The organization has sat in on panels and staff tables at community events to raise awareness around prison issues. Books Through Bars has also hosted a film festival, read-a-thons, as well as various public conversation on alternatives to prisons

The group is responsible for affecting thousands of lives, from the organizations recipients across the US down to the volunteers who’ve dedicated their time to make a difference. fb_img_1520612713256858056820.jpg

The group gathers most of its books from donations and is always looking for more, I decided to do my part by hosting a Read-Olympics and Book Drive on behalf of the program. Blu Moon Fiction will also be selling a fantasy art calendar featuring local talent. With 10% of the proceeds going to this organization right here.

If you’d like to donate your time as well as a book or two. Books Through Bars;  holds weekly volunteering, Tuesday nights 7:30–9:30 PM. But if you’re in the area on a weekend and would like to also volunteer you can also do so on the 1st & 3rd Saturday of every month.

Which Organizations Do You Like To Support?

Leave A Comment Below!


You can keep up with me, Noel Bleu and Blu Moon Fiction on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, GoodReads and Pinterest, or Shoot me an email @ BluMoonFiction@gmail.com

Blu Moon Fiction Calendar: Coming Soon

I’m always looking for new ideas to promote literacy and to engage in my creative side. If I can find a way to promote local talent as well that is an added bonus. So while brainstorming ideas for my next fundraising project; I decided to put together a fantasy art calendar featuring local artists.

The fantasy art calendar will feature artists from Philadelphia and the surrounding area and money raised from the sale of the calendar will be donated to the local charity, Books Through Bars. I discovered the group, which sends books to inmates in the Mid-Atlantic region of the US, while looking for volunteer opportunities.

The organization is always in need of book donations, extra helping hands and donations of course. Which is what


spawned the idea for the calendar, book drive and Read-Olympics all coming soon in the next few months.

I’m looking for local artists, in the Philadelphia and surrounding area. All submissions are welcome. Any interested artists should include two sketches for review. The first sketch should have the #WhatsYourStory theme.

#WhatsYourStory is Blu Moon Fiction’s call to action. It not only encourages creative’s to share their perspectives but also serves as a challenge to find innovative ways in expressing our creativity.

This sketch is a freestyle option, provided it includes #WhatsYourStory in the actual picture.

The only requirement for the second picture is that the central theme must be books or reading. If I get enough responses I’ll happily produce multiple calendars using everyone’s artwork. For now, I’m looking for 12 local artists interested in sharing their talents for a good cause. 10% of the proceeds from the calendar will be donated to Books Through Bars.

Check back with Blu Moon Fiction, over the next few weeks for more details on the Blu Moon Fiction 2018 Read-Olympics/ Book Drive. As well as for more info on how to get involved with the Blu Moon Fiction Fantasy Calendar. If interested in participating in either the Blu Moon Fiction calendar or The Read – Olympics, send all inquiries to BluMoonFiction@gmail.com Subject: Calendar

Know An Artist Who’d Love To Be In The Calendar?

Tag Them Below!


You can keep up with me, Noel Bleu and Blu Moon Fiction on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, GoodReads and Pinterest, or Shoot me an email @ BluMoonFiction@gmail.com

Welcome to Wakanda: The Evolution of Black Panther


It’s a little like the chicken and the egg discussion. Did Stan Lee develop his Black Panther superhero after the Black Panther party or did they decide to use the name after hearing of the african king’s heroics. The truth would be that both most likely drew their inspiration from the  Lowndes County Freedom Organization (LCFO) in Alabama, which borrowed the fearsome Black Panther from the Clark University panthers.

The Black Panther first appeared in Fantastic Four #52 in July of 1966. Real name T’Challa, the panther we meet in Marvel’s Black Panther and the comic book hero are as Black Pantherdifferent as the creative minds behind them.

Black Panther, real name is T’Challa, is the king and protector of the fictionalized African nation of Waknda.Black Panther possesses enhanced abilities earned through ancient Wakandan rituals of drinking the heart shaped herb. He also relies on his proficiency in science, rigorous physical training, hand-to-hand combat skills, and access to wealth and advanced technology to defeat his enemies.

Black Panther is the first mainstream superhero of African descent in American comics, pioneering the way for heroes such as the Falcon (1969) and Luke Cage (1972) or DC Comics’ John Stewart in the role of Green Lantern (1971).

Throughout The Black Panther storyline which ran through thirteen issues of the Jungle Action series, we’ve seen King T’Challa as well as Kasper Cole, a multiracial New York Black Panther2City police officer and even T’Challa’s sister Shuri for a time when he is left recovering from critical injuries take on the task of being the Black Panther.

The kingdom of Wakanda also underwent a realistic makeover to become a more believable African nation. Starting with king T’Chaka played by Xhosa actor John Kani of South Africa. Boseman as well as dialect coach Beth McGuire decided to maintain the Xhosa accent and located other national Xhosa speakers to aid in the development of an authentic dialect. The variance in the cast whose nationalities and ancestries ranged throughout the African diaspora created a truly organic dialect and gave Wakanda a real life of its own.  

The Black Panther has been featured in various television shows, animated films and video games with Chadwick Boseman as the most recent actor to portray our feral hero. First appearing in the 2016 film Captain America: Civil War, and officially in the 2018 film Black Panther.

WWW Wednesday (Jan 24,2018)


Hey all…. it’s WWW Wednesday again! As always, it’s really easy because there are only THREE questions! WWW Wednesday is hosted by Sam @ Taking on a World of Words! Be sure to post your answers in the comments below and head over to Sam’s when you’re done!


What are you currently reading?

It’s funny this is the second week in a row the #AmReading book is actually one I haven’t started just yet. I will be reading it right after I divide my pages. Tithe by Holly Black has been a part of my library for at least a year.

It was part of a book binge I experienced right after breaking my reading slump. I gorged my shelves with fantasy and came across this “modern faerie tale”

I’m said to meet 16- year – old Kaye, officially making this my first YA book of the year. Her nomadic lifestyle amidst her mom’s rockband is disrupted and she ends up in NJ in the middle of a faerie firefight.

It definitely looks interesting. 331 pages with an excerpt for White Cat (another book I haven’t read yet) inside.


What did you recently finish reading?

I finished reading Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister by Gregory Maguire on Monday. While writing the review which you can read here, I learned about the Disney adaptation of the book featuring Stockard Channing as Margarethe ten Broek Fisher Van den Meer. As expected Disney’s adaptation glazed over the murder, threw in some actual magic, a fairy godmother and made Clara more agreeable and less like an unwilling child bride.


What do you think you’ll read next?

At this point I’ve had enough of Cinderella and her sisters, though Maguire has written a spin to Alice in Wonderland, and I haven’t read the ready of The Wicked Years yet. I’m actually considering starting the Lunar Chronicles by Marisa Meyer.

What Are You Reading Right Now? Leave A Comment Below!


You can keep up with me, Noel Bleu and Blu Moon Fiction on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, GoodReads and Pinterest, or Shoot me an email @ BluMoonFiction@gmail.com

What We’re Reading: Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister


Rating: 5 out of 5

There are many inceptions of maidens being rescued from poverty by handsome princes. Most renowned is probably “Cinderella”. First recorded in 7 BC Egypt; the tale appears in Italy around 1634 and laid the groundwork for both Charles Perrault (1697) and the Grimm Brothers(1812). With Disney, sampling from Perrault in their 1950 animated movie. Though borrowing the french Prince Phillippe de Marsillac our tale takes place in Holland.

I have come to regard Gregory Maguire as one of my favorite authors. His ability to recreate and expand upon world’s I’m familiar with is refreshing. I aspire to his talents someday in my own writing pursuits.

After my experience with Wicked I knew he was a good author but my read through Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister gave me a newfound respect. Set during the 17th Century, the book was simple enough to read, I even learned a few new words no longer in common use.

A reimagining of the classic fairytale Cinderella, Confessions offers a look at the tale from the view of the stepsisters of the fairytale. One mentally impaired, oversized and unable to speak. The other extremely observant; clever in her own right, a talented painter if not heavy on the eyes. Two sisters thrust into our story by fate.


Someone murdered Jack Fisher, and because of his death the widow Fisher and her two daughters Ruth and Iris fled to Holland for safety. Having read the story, I have my own ideas as to why Margarethe may have been in danger.

Once there we witness Cinderella, through Maguire’s eyes. The widow Fisher works as a scullery maid for room, board and meager wages to care for herself and her two daughters. Though she earns the affections of painter, Luykas Schoonmaker, she leaves for a position in the wealthier Van den Meer household. Initially they are servants, but Margarethe ensures that soon she is the mistress of the house.

I enjoy Maguire’s ability to add depth to his characters. He advises initially that the story of Cinderella had been embellished to disguise a families shame and proceeds to unveil the sordid details of how Clara “Cinderella” Van den Meer came to find her prince. There was almost nothing I would change about the novel except for the minor loose end that is discussed but not resolved in the epilogue.

**Spoiler Alert**

Echoing the traditional tale, widow Margarethe Fisher marries wealthy widower merchant Cornelius Van den Meer and is charged with caring for his home and his beautiful daughter Clara. Margarethe has two daughters of her own, though the eldest Ruth is oversized and mute, the youngest Iris is merely unbearably plain to look at. Despite her hopes, however, the Van den Meer fortune was not as secure as she’d speculated and the fate of of the household depends on attending the royal ball and wooing the Prince.

The Van den Meer fortune, has as big a role in the story as any other character and it was more impactful. It was their wealth that made the Vinckboons so notable in Haarlem, their wealth attracted Cornelius Van den Meer, Henrika’s dowry made him wealthy and kept him in line.

Their wealth drew the attention of the kidnappers, “Crows”, who took Clara and called Margarethe to their home. It was wealth Margarethe coveted, squandered and lost. The family fortune was restored and possibly exceeded when Clara ascended the throne. The Van den Meer fortune was the true magical force in the story.

Confessions is a story of transformations, altering the tale of “Cinderella” itself entirely but specifically regarding the characters. Margarethe is crafty, always moving she consistently changes her surroundings and her station in pursuit of “better”. Always looking for her next big opportunity.

It is then ironic that her sight is the very sense that begins to fail her, having been so sharp with her tongue regarding beauty and her observations of the world around her. We watch a gradual regression of her sight and its effects on her ability to manipulate her world.

The concept of sight is heavily discussed in the book with focuses on artwork, religion and beauty being mentioned frequently. We come to discover that though the story is full of artists, monstrosities, muses and fair maidens, each character lacked some form of beauty and was unwilling to see the truth of their world.


Clara is both gifted and cursed with physical beauty. It is possibly what attracted the kidnappers to her in the first place, a reason the townspeople think she is a changeling, as well as the reason her father commissions, Girl with Tulips. Her beauty is her greatest asset and her biggest burden. She despises the attention she gets for being attractive, yet it is her looks that earns the affections of the Prince. She was blind to her strength but was willing to forsake her comforts for the safety of her family.

Iris is visibly hard to look at, but has a sharp mind and a keen eye.

She absorbs images like a sponge, a gift that exhibits itself in her painting and weakens itself when blurred by her emotions. She is blind to her own inner beauty, her resilience of spirit or how others perceive her.

She becomes so accustomed to being criticized on her outer beauty, she disregards her gifts entirely, only realizing after its too late that she too had a chance at the Prince. It is Iris who made it feasible for Clara to attend the ball. Her inability to see Caspar’s feelings for her is one of few annoyances throughout the story.

Margarethe was unwilling to see her future with Schoonmaker who may have truly cared for her once, her obsession with wealth corrupts her and she grows old and literally blind to the world around her. Everyone seems blind to Ruth as she is mute and perceived unintelligent, she actually happens to be the narrator, proving her to be highly observant in her own right and equally intelligent.

Beauty is seen both superficially in the obvious beauty of the tulips or Clara, but also in stark contrast to things seen as ugly. The the beauty of sorrow is addressed. The comparison of how uncomely Iris is in comparison to the wildflowers of the meadow as well as her step sister Clara. Clara has all the beauty and social graces that Iris lacks but is confined to the manor first by her mother and then by herself.

She is infantile and spoiled though she matures over time taking on the responsibilities of the kitchen and her ailing fathers health. Her looks occasionally currency for items Margarethe desires but can’t afford. Maguire uses the obsession with stereotypical beauty as a curse while elevating inner beauty to a higher standard. It is kindness that indicates true beauty.

This is the second book I’ve read, (since I haven’t finished the Wicked Years series) that Maguire reimagines with a less fantastical explanation to magical occurrences. The concepts of magic are considered to be childlike understanding that as you grow you create your own magic. Margarethe often says to let her cast her eel spear and to move out of her way. Clara sees herself and Ruth initially as changelings, Iris believes she sees imps and Margarethe flees England with the girls for fear of persecution of being a witch.

Maguire toys with societies superstitions and understanding of science during that time period to give a more realistic still very magical spin on the chain of events that control our story.

Margarethe’s gifts for herbs which suited her in getting her way was also her downfall, perhaps the price for trafficking in that particular sort of “magic”. The loss of her eyesight fitting for a woman whose hubris and vanity hinged on pride and appearance.

The imp that plagues Iris and the crows who “changed” Clara are metaphors, psychological projections of the evils of man. Clara rationalized the ‘crows’ as spirits who abducted her for misbehaving and returned her once she became a “good” child. In truth she was kidnapped probably by Von Stalk, (it’s never made clear if he’s definitely responsible). Iris feels the “imp” whenever she or another character are up to some form of mischief or another.

Having finished the book my only question is did Margarethe kill her husband or did she really flee because they thought she was a witch? I would love to know more of her backstory. It reminds me of Cora from Once Upon A Time.

Have You Read Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister by

Gregory Maguire? What did you think? Which is your favorite retelling of Cinderella? Let me Know in the Comments Below!

You can keep up with me, Noel Bleu and Blu Moon Fiction on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, GoodReads and Pinterest, or Shoot me an email @ BluMoonFiction@gmail.com

WWW Wednesday  (Jan 17, 2018)


Hey all…. it’s WWW Wednesday again! As always, it’s really easy because there are only THREE questions! WWW Wednesday is hosted by Sam @ Taking on a World of Words! Be sure to post your answers in the comments below and head over to Sam’s when you’re done!


What are you currently reading?

confessions of ugly stepsister

While writing this post, I must admit I haven’t actually started reading this book yet. I probably will have read a few pages, once this has been published.

I’m finally getting around to reading Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister by Gregory Maguire author of “The Wicked Years,” series. Based on the children’s story Cinderella. Maguire uses his typical flair to retell the classic tale from the perspective of the sisters left behind.

The story is set in 17th century Holland and since I’m not familiar with it at all. I’ll just have to read on to find out more about it.


What did you recently finish reading?


I finished reading Kindred by Octavia Butler, yesterday afternoon. The fantastical tale of a modern woman of the 70s transported to the antebellum South to save the life of a young boy named Rufus. Our heroine endures, the systematic abuse of the time period while trying to complete her mission and return home. This book will infuriate you, bring tears to your eyes and have you cheering for the unspeakable. But if you read it, you’ll be happy you did.


I also recently finished Hart’s Hope by Orson Scott Card. I respect that man as a pioneer in the speculative fiction genre but regretfully disliked this book a lot. The reasons are endless and you can read more about them here. Definitely check it out for yourself before making your final opinions.


What do you think you’ll read next?

I’m honestly not sure I’ve been meaning to finish reading American Gods by Neil Gaiman, but I also wouldn’t mind starting a new series…decisions….

What Are You Reading Right Now? Leave A Comment Below!


You can keep up with me, Noel Bleu and Blu Moon Fiction on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, GoodReads and Pinterest, or Shoot me an email @ BluMoonFiction@gmail.com