Featured Author: Marlon James

For black history month this year I wanted to try something that spoke to the blog itself while still shedding light on fantasy and writers of color. Each Friday for the rest of 358fdd0c873707ea62162bf8d0c0184345167563636023847.jpgFebruary. I’ll be sharing another talented author and their body of work.

This week I discovered an author whom I actually already had on my TBR. While doing a bookstore browse many years ago. At that time the distinctive cover showed a woman who’s skin was a striking contrast to the paleness of the background surrounding her.

The Book of Night Women. tells the story of Lilith, born into slavery on a Jamaican sugar plantation at the end of the eighteenth century. At her birth, the slave 64f0abdf369633633bfb407331e9052a6281915892799790816.jpgwomen around her recognize a dark power that they and she will come to both revere and fear. 

Marlon James, born in Kingston, Jamaica left Jamaica to escape homophobic violence and economic conditions that he felt would mean career stagnation, he received a master’s degree in creative writing from Wilkes University in Wilkes7884e152a061d4850cf1e4f61cccd7d84859259759275158337.jpg Barre, PA. 

His first novel, John Crow’s Devil was rejected 70 times before being accepted for publication in 2005. James has taught English and creative writing at Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota, since 2007.  He is also a faculty lecturer at St. Francis College’s Low Residency MFA in Creative Writing.

In February 2019, James gave the seventh annual Tolkien Lecture at Pembroke College, Oxford.  He has published four novels: John Crow’s Devil, The Book of Night Women, A Brief History of Seven Killings which was the winner of the 2015 Man Booker Prize, and Black Leopard, Red Wolf. He is now living in Minneapolis. 

 

Which of the Marlon James Novels Have You Read? Leave A Comment Below!

 

You can keep up with me, Noel Bleu and Blu Moon Fiction on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, GoodReads and Pinterest, or Shoot me an email @ BluMoonFiction@gmail.com

 

Featured Author: L. A. Banks

For black history month this year I wanted to try something that spoke to the blog itself while still shedding light on fantasy and writers of color. Each Friday for the rest of February. I’ll be sharing another talented author and their body of work.

ec3eab148b2944dfd84495eb900e8a8a3355255612623085561.jpgThis week I have the special pleasure of highlighting not only an amazing, award winning author, but also a legendary Philadelphia native whose body of work crossed genres.

I’m describing none of other than author Leslie Ann Esdaile Banks. She has written under the pen name Leslie Esdaile, Leslie E. Banks, Leslie Banks, Leslie Esdaile Banks and L. A. Banks. With the latter penning at least 19 books in the dark fantasy/horror.

Inspired by her life experiences and the abnormal intensity of crime and political injustice in the city. She created a world where she could express her political views and cultural experiences to the world. A world where the CEOs of major companies were vampires draining the life’s blood from African American youth. 

Born in 1959, Leslie has won numerous awards but is most noted for snagging the 2008 87a26fba2e588539f7ed1f528bf5dd847992586320228627.jpgEssence Storyteller of the Year literary award.  As L. A. Banks she wrote The Vampire Huntress, Crimson Moon, Dark Avengers and The Dark series. However she has written in multiple genres, including African-American literature, romance, women’s fiction, crime suspense, dark fantasy/horror and non-fiction.exploring different nationalities and cultures within her work. 

I recall hearing the name but never actually read anything from her. I honestly wouldn’t have known about her if I wasn’t actively looking for authors of color who wrote in the fantasy genre. She lived in Philly this entire time! 

Sadly Mrs. Banks passed away from cancer on August 2, 2011, at the age of 51. She left behind a daughter, Helena Esdaile and a literary catalog to make any book-lover drool. That’s what makes L. A. Banks this week’s featured author. I’ve already added Bad Blood and Minion to my TBR. 

 

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Have You Read The Vampire Huntress Legend or Crimson Moon series? Leave A Comment Below!

 

You can keep up with me, Noel Bleu and Blu Moon Fiction on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, GoodReads and Pinterest, or Shoot me an email @ BluMoonFiction@gmail.com

 

Check out this video of the late, great Ms. L. A. Banks Queen of the Vampires, tamer of Shadow wolves. 

WWW Wednesday (April 18,2018)

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Blu Moon Fiction is back, (Wedneday will never be the same again, lol) It’s WWW Wednesday again! As always, it’s really easy because there are only THREE questions! WWW Wednesday is hosted by Sam @ Taking on a World of Words! Be sure to post your answers in the comments below and head over to Sam’s when you’re done!

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What are you currently reading?

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I’ve been hearing so much about this book lately that when I saw it was available for purchase, I had to snag it. Turns out this book happens to be an Advanced Reader’s Copy someone let slip through their fingers. I’m more than happy to make it a part of my home library. Song of Blood & Stone by L. Penelope is the highly anticipated first novel in the Earthsinger Chronicles and I should be finished reading it by Sunday night.

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What did you recently finish reading?

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I finally finished reading Tithe by Holly Black. A book I started back in late January and hadn’t had time to finish before this month. It’s definitely a book I had to power through but once I got into the story I was super happy I stayed with it. I am a chronic, ship-jumper when it comes to stories I don’t enjoy.  The final moments in the book were enough to inspire me to add the other books in the series to my TBR list. You can check out the review for Tithe here.

 

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What do you think you’ll read next?

There are so many options, books on my TBR list, books that are on my bookshelf that I haven’t added to by TBR list, the occassional Book Haul to muddy things up. I recently purchased a steampunk fairytale anthology that i’m dying to sink my teeth into so maybe that will be my next read.

What Are You Reading Right Now? Leave A Comment Below!

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You can keep up with me, Noel Bleu and Blu Moon Fiction on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, GoodReads and Pinterest, or Shoot me an email @ BluMoonFiction@gmail.com

Bleu Reviews: Tithe

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3 out of 5

The old saying, “You can’t judge a book by it’s cover,” and the following,  “Or the first few chapters,” was made for this book. I discovered Tithe on a GoodReads suggestion list because I enjoy both faeries, dark fiction and Urban Fantasy. It may have also been suggested by Amazon after I binged on Artemis Fowl. Either way, the 331 page book complete with twelve pages of White Cat (another Holly Black book) weren’t terrifying, the short and stout book may have even been shorter in a hard back with larger font and longer pages.

I remember the cover being what swayed my decision to buy it. What looks to be a butterfly missing a body is on the cover with green splattered font to display the title. Visually it is very pleasing, but reading it took a bit more time than I thought it’d would.

Having never read Holly Black I wasn’t sure what to expect, I haven’t read Spiderwick Chronicles and barely made it through the movie. What I did know was that Holly Black was the highly publicized “Queen of the Faeries”, so who better to read first?

My initial response to the book was that I was waiting. Waiting for the action to start, waiting for secrets to be revealed, waiting for the meat and potatoes of my book or I was waiting to get to the final page and be done with it. A move and getting settled back into my office put this book back on the shelf for two months, but when I finally committed I finished reading the book in about four days.

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What I Liked!

I absolutely love the playful romance between Kaye and Roiben, it is still a very cliched as Roiben the older more experienced magical being becomes an accidental protector of the fair young Kaye. That Kaye is not helpless and at times is even rebellious makes her a more enjoyable heroin. Their relationship as it develops throughout the book was one of few thing that kept me going.

Once I got into it I was also quite intrigued by the mystery and deception of the gentry. The multitude of layers beneath the story and the plan for Kaye during the Tithe all seemed to be buried deep until the very last pages. This book is full of twists and turns and I’m happy I stayed along for the ride.

This may be a little macabre but I’m happy that SOMEONE if not several people died. My interests in fiction are a little bit darker than most, I adore a good fairy tale as long as we can muddy it up a bit, the Fae in this story are not like Tinkerbell for sure and the wickedness that comes from that usually end in bloodshed. The lives lost during the escalation of the story were necessary “sacrifices” to give the book its edge and maintain realism.

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What I Didn’t Like…

It took a while for me to actually invest in the story. As a person from Philadelphia familiar with New Jersey I can say for certainty that despite a jab or two regarding my hometown the setting was perfect. However, the progression of the story din’t pull me in. I truly didn’t care for the book as whole until page 104. The book seemed to drag on in an attempt to subtly hint at the secrets and plot twists. It was almost as if Black didn’t trust the reader could pick up on the foreshadowing within the first few pages. I figured out Kaye’s brilliant secret by page 15 and spent the rest of the time wondering how long it would take for the rest of the world to find out if that was the goal. I don’t think there needs to be an 80 page gap between the inception of her “talents” and the actual declaration of them.

Spike…I didn’t like him. I applaud Black for her amazing development of her characters, no one entity was completely good or bad. For example even though Kaye was a high school drop out who smoked cigarettes and cursed, she was still brave and kind and a “good person”. The revelation that not all of those looking after Kaye were “on her side” definitely sucked me into the story and made Spike my second most hated, second only to Nephamael who was a piece of work in his own right.

*Minor note: I didn’t like that Kaye found her younger self, stuck at age 4. I’m not certain the significance of that particular scene besides adding evidence that Silarial was aware of her identity. Understanding that this is a series, I’d hope the explanation of baby Kaye could be explained or at least wonder if they plan to return her.

Overall I enjoyed the book a lot more than I thought I would, I’m officially interested in checking out Valiant and Ironside and will be adding them to my TBR list!

 

Have You Read Tithe by  Holly Black?

What did you think?  Leave a comment below!

You can keep up with me, Noel Bleu and Blu Moon Fiction on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, GoodReads and Pinterest, or Shoot me an email @ BluMoonFiction@gmail.com

WWW Wednesday (Jan 24,2018)

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Hey all…. it’s WWW Wednesday again! As always, it’s really easy because there are only THREE questions! WWW Wednesday is hosted by Sam @ Taking on a World of Words! Be sure to post your answers in the comments below and head over to Sam’s when you’re done!

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What are you currently reading?

It’s funny this is the second week in a row the #AmReading book is actually one I haven’t started just yet. I will be reading it right after I divide my pages. Tithe by Holly Black has been a part of my library for at least a year.

It was part of a book binge I experienced right after breaking my reading slump. I gorged my shelves with fantasy and came across this “modern faerie tale”

I’m said to meet 16- year – old Kaye, officially making this my first YA book of the year. Her nomadic lifestyle amidst her mom’s rockband is disrupted and she ends up in NJ in the middle of a faerie firefight.

It definitely looks interesting. 331 pages with an excerpt for White Cat (another book I haven’t read yet) inside.

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What did you recently finish reading?

I finished reading Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister by Gregory Maguire on Monday. While writing the review which you can read here, I learned about the Disney adaptation of the book featuring Stockard Channing as Margarethe ten Broek Fisher Van den Meer. As expected Disney’s adaptation glazed over the murder, threw in some actual magic, a fairy godmother and made Clara more agreeable and less like an unwilling child bride.

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What do you think you’ll read next?

At this point I’ve had enough of Cinderella and her sisters, though Maguire has written a spin to Alice in Wonderland, and I haven’t read the ready of The Wicked Years yet. I’m actually considering starting the Lunar Chronicles by Marisa Meyer.

What Are You Reading Right Now? Leave A Comment Below!

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You can keep up with me, Noel Bleu and Blu Moon Fiction on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, GoodReads and Pinterest, or Shoot me an email @ BluMoonFiction@gmail.com

Bleu Reviews: Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister

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Rating: 5 out of 5

There are many inceptions of maidens being rescued from poverty by handsome princes. Most renowned is probably “Cinderella”. First recorded in 7 BC Egypt; the tale appears in Italy around 1634 and laid the groundwork for both Charles Perrault (1697) and the Grimm Brothers(1812). With Disney, sampling from Perrault in their 1950 animated movie. Though borrowing the french Prince Phillippe de Marsillac our tale takes place in Holland.

I have come to regard Gregory Maguire as one of my favorite authors. His ability to recreate and expand upon world’s I’m familiar with is refreshing. I aspire to his talents someday in my own writing pursuits.

After my experience with Wicked I knew he was a good author but my read through Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister gave me a newfound respect. Set during the 17th Century, the book was simple enough to read, I even learned a few new words no longer in common use.

A reimagining of the classic fairytale Cinderella, Confessions offers a look at the tale from the view of the stepsisters of the fairytale. One mentally impaired, oversized and unable to speak. The other extremely observant; clever in her own right, a talented painter if not heavy on the eyes. Two sisters thrust into our story by fate.

Murder…

Someone murdered Jack Fisher, and because of his death the widow Fisher and her two daughters Ruth and Iris fled to Holland for safety. Having read the story, I have my own ideas as to why Margarethe may have been in danger.

Once there we witness Cinderella, through Maguire’s eyes. The widow Fisher works as a scullery maid for room, board and meager wages to care for herself and her two daughters. Though she earns the affections of painter, Luykas Schoonmaker, she leaves for a position in the wealthier Van den Meer household. Initially they are servants, but Margarethe ensures that soon she is the mistress of the house.

I enjoy Maguire’s ability to add depth to his characters. He advises initially that the story of Cinderella had been embellished to disguise a families shame and proceeds to unveil the sordid details of how Clara “Cinderella” Van den Meer came to find her prince. There was almost nothing I would change about the novel except for the minor loose end that is discussed but not resolved in the epilogue.

**Spoiler Alert**

Echoing the traditional tale, widow Margarethe Fisher marries wealthy widower merchant Cornelius Van den Meer and is charged with caring for his home and his beautiful daughter Clara. Margarethe has two daughters of her own, though the eldest Ruth is oversized and mute, the youngest Iris is merely unbearably plain to look at. Despite her hopes, however, the Van den Meer fortune was not as secure as she’d speculated and the fate of of the household depends on attending the royal ball and wooing the Prince.

The Van den Meer fortune, has as big a role in the story as any other character and it was more impactful. It was their wealth that made the Vinckboons so notable in Haarlem, their wealth attracted Cornelius Van den Meer, Henrika’s dowry made him wealthy and kept him in line.

Their wealth drew the attention of the kidnappers, “Crows”, who took Clara and called Margarethe to their home. It was wealth Margarethe coveted, squandered and lost. The family fortune was restored and possibly exceeded when Clara ascended the throne. The Van den Meer fortune was the true magical force in the story.

Confessions is a story of transformations, altering the tale of “Cinderella” itself entirely but specifically regarding the characters. Margarethe is crafty, always moving she consistently changes her surroundings and her station in pursuit of “better”. Always looking for her next big opportunity.

It is then ironic that her sight is the very sense that begins to fail her, having been so sharp with her tongue regarding beauty and her observations of the world around her. We watch a gradual regression of her sight and its effects on her ability to manipulate her world.

The concept of sight is heavily discussed in the book with focuses on artwork, religion and beauty being mentioned frequently. We come to discover that though the story is full of artists, monstrosities, muses and fair maidens, each character lacked some form of beauty and was unwilling to see the truth of their world.

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Clara is both gifted and cursed with physical beauty. It is possibly what attracted the kidnappers to her in the first place, a reason the townspeople think she is a changeling, as well as the reason her father commissions, Girl with Tulips. Her beauty is her greatest asset and her biggest burden. She despises the attention she gets for being attractive, yet it is her looks that earns the affections of the Prince. She was blind to her strength but was willing to forsake her comforts for the safety of her family.

Iris is visibly hard to look at, but has a sharp mind and a keen eye.

She absorbs images like a sponge, a gift that exhibits itself in her painting and weakens itself when blurred by her emotions. She is blind to her own inner beauty, her resilience of spirit or how others perceive her.

She becomes so accustomed to being criticized on her outer beauty, she disregards her gifts entirely, only realizing after its too late that she too had a chance at the Prince. It is Iris who made it feasible for Clara to attend the ball. Her inability to see Caspar’s feelings for her is one of few annoyances throughout the story.

Margarethe was unwilling to see her future with Schoonmaker who may have truly cared for her once, her obsession with wealth corrupts her and she grows old and literally blind to the world around her. Everyone seems blind to Ruth as she is mute and perceived unintelligent, she actually happens to be the narrator, proving her to be highly observant in her own right and equally intelligent.

Beauty is seen both superficially in the obvious beauty of the tulips or Clara, but also in stark contrast to things seen as ugly. The the beauty of sorrow is addressed. The comparison of how uncomely Iris is in comparison to the wildflowers of the meadow as well as her step sister Clara. Clara has all the beauty and social graces that Iris lacks but is confined to the manor first by her mother and then by herself.

She is infantile and spoiled though she matures over time taking on the responsibilities of the kitchen and her ailing fathers health. Her looks occasionally currency for items Margarethe desires but can’t afford. Maguire uses the obsession with stereotypical beauty as a curse while elevating inner beauty to a higher standard. It is kindness that indicates true beauty.

This is the second book I’ve read, (since I haven’t finished the Wicked Years series) that Maguire reimagines with a less fantastical explanation to magical occurrences. The concepts of magic are considered to be childlike understanding that as you grow you create your own magic. Margarethe often says to let her cast her eel spear and to move out of her way. Clara sees herself and Ruth initially as changelings, Iris believes she sees imps and Margarethe flees England with the girls for fear of persecution of being a witch.

Maguire toys with societies superstitions and understanding of science during that time period to give a more realistic still very magical spin on the chain of events that control our story.

Margarethe’s gifts for herbs which suited her in getting her way was also her downfall, perhaps the price for trafficking in that particular sort of “magic”. The loss of her eyesight fitting for a woman whose hubris and vanity hinged on pride and appearance.

The imp that plagues Iris and the crows who “changed” Clara are metaphors, psychological projections of the evils of man. Clara rationalized the ‘crows’ as spirits who abducted her for misbehaving and returned her once she became a “good” child. In truth she was kidnapped probably by Von Stalk, (it’s never made clear if he’s definitely responsible). Iris feels the “imp” whenever she or another character are up to some form of mischief or another.

Having finished the book my only question is did Margarethe kill her husband or did she really flee because they thought she was a witch? I would love to know more of her backstory. It reminds me of Cora from Once Upon A Time.

Have You Read Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister by

Gregory Maguire? What did you think? Which is your favorite retelling of Cinderella? Let me Know in the Comments Below!

You can keep up with me, Noel Bleu and Blu Moon Fiction on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, GoodReads and Pinterest, or Shoot me an email @ BluMoonFiction@gmail.com

What We're Reading: Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister

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Rating: 5 out of 5

There are many inceptions of maidens being rescued from poverty by handsome princes. Most renowned is probably “Cinderella”. First recorded in 7 BC Egypt; the tale appears in Italy around 1634 and laid the groundwork for both Charles Perrault (1697) and the Grimm Brothers(1812). With Disney, sampling from Perrault in their 1950 animated movie. Though borrowing the french Prince Phillippe de Marsillac our tale takes place in Holland.

I have come to regard Gregory Maguire as one of my favorite authors. His ability to recreate and expand upon world’s I’m familiar with is refreshing. I aspire to his talents someday in my own writing pursuits.

After my experience with Wicked I knew he was a good author but my read through Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister gave me a newfound respect. Set during the 17th Century, the book was simple enough to read, I even learned a few new words no longer in common use.

A reimagining of the classic fairytale Cinderella, Confessions offers a look at the tale from the view of the stepsisters of the fairytale. One mentally impaired, oversized and unable to speak. The other extremely observant; clever in her own right, a talented painter if not heavy on the eyes. Two sisters thrust into our story by fate.

Murder…

Someone murdered Jack Fisher, and because of his death the widow Fisher and her two daughters Ruth and Iris fled to Holland for safety. Having read the story, I have my own ideas as to why Margarethe may have been in danger.

Once there we witness Cinderella, through Maguire’s eyes. The widow Fisher works as a scullery maid for room, board and meager wages to care for herself and her two daughters. Though she earns the affections of painter, Luykas Schoonmaker, she leaves for a position in the wealthier Van den Meer household. Initially they are servants, but Margarethe ensures that soon she is the mistress of the house.

I enjoy Maguire’s ability to add depth to his characters. He advises initially that the story of Cinderella had been embellished to disguise a families shame and proceeds to unveil the sordid details of how Clara “Cinderella” Van den Meer came to find her prince. There was almost nothing I would change about the novel except for the minor loose end that is discussed but not resolved in the epilogue.

**Spoiler Alert**

Echoing the traditional tale, widow Margarethe Fisher marries wealthy widower merchant Cornelius Van den Meer and is charged with caring for his home and his beautiful daughter Clara. Margarethe has two daughters of her own, though the eldest Ruth is oversized and mute, the youngest Iris is merely unbearably plain to look at. Despite her hopes, however, the Van den Meer fortune was not as secure as she’d speculated and the fate of of the household depends on attending the royal ball and wooing the Prince.

The Van den Meer fortune, has as big a role in the story as any other character and it was more impactful. It was their wealth that made the Vinckboons so notable in Haarlem, their wealth attracted Cornelius Van den Meer, Henrika’s dowry made him wealthy and kept him in line.

Their wealth drew the attention of the kidnappers, “Crows”, who took Clara and called Margarethe to their home. It was wealth Margarethe coveted, squandered and lost. The family fortune was restored and possibly exceeded when Clara ascended the throne. The Van den Meer fortune was the true magical force in the story.

Confessions is a story of transformations, altering the tale of “Cinderella” itself entirely but specifically regarding the characters. Margarethe is crafty, always moving she consistently changes her surroundings and her station in pursuit of “better”. Always looking for her next big opportunity.

It is then ironic that her sight is the very sense that begins to fail her, having been so sharp with her tongue regarding beauty and her observations of the world around her. We watch a gradual regression of her sight and its effects on her ability to manipulate her world.

The concept of sight is heavily discussed in the book with focuses on artwork, religion and beauty being mentioned frequently. We come to discover that though the story is full of artists, monstrosities, muses and fair maidens, each character lacked some form of beauty and was unwilling to see the truth of their world.

d89915612e93a6156e3fbaaed25b4e0b144921915.jpg

Clara is both gifted and cursed with physical beauty. It is possibly what attracted the kidnappers to her in the first place, a reason the townspeople think she is a changeling, as well as the reason her father commissions, Girl with Tulips. Her beauty is her greatest asset and her biggest burden. She despises the attention she gets for being attractive, yet it is her looks that earns the affections of the Prince. She was blind to her strength but was willing to forsake her comforts for the safety of her family.

Iris is visibly hard to look at, but has a sharp mind and a keen eye.

She absorbs images like a sponge, a gift that exhibits itself in her painting and weakens itself when blurred by her emotions. She is blind to her own inner beauty, her resilience of spirit or how others perceive her.

She becomes so accustomed to being criticized on her outer beauty, she disregards her gifts entirely, only realizing after its too late that she too had a chance at the Prince. It is Iris who made it feasible for Clara to attend the ball. Her inability to see Caspar’s feelings for her is one of few annoyances throughout the story.

Margarethe was unwilling to see her future with Schoonmaker who may have truly cared for her once, her obsession with wealth corrupts her and she grows old and literally blind to the world around her. Everyone seems blind to Ruth as she is mute and perceived unintelligent, she actually happens to be the narrator, proving her to be highly observant in her own right and equally intelligent.

Beauty is seen both superficially in the obvious beauty of the tulips or Clara, but also in stark contrast to things seen as ugly. The the beauty of sorrow is addressed. The comparison of how uncomely Iris is in comparison to the wildflowers of the meadow as well as her step sister Clara. Clara has all the beauty and social graces that Iris lacks but is confined to the manor first by her mother and then by herself.

She is infantile and spoiled though she matures over time taking on the responsibilities of the kitchen and her ailing fathers health. Her looks occasionally currency for items Margarethe desires but can’t afford. Maguire uses the obsession with stereotypical beauty as a curse while elevating inner beauty to a higher standard. It is kindness that indicates true beauty.

This is the second book I’ve read, (since I haven’t finished the Wicked Years series) that Maguire reimagines with a less fantastical explanation to magical occurrences. The concepts of magic are considered to be childlike understanding that as you grow you create your own magic. Margarethe often says to let her cast her eel spear and to move out of her way. Clara sees herself and Ruth initially as changelings, Iris believes she sees imps and Margarethe flees England with the girls for fear of persecution of being a witch.

Maguire toys with societies superstitions and understanding of science during that time period to give a more realistic still very magical spin on the chain of events that control our story.

Margarethe’s gifts for herbs which suited her in getting her way was also her downfall, perhaps the price for trafficking in that particular sort of “magic”. The loss of her eyesight fitting for a woman whose hubris and vanity hinged on pride and appearance.

The imp that plagues Iris and the crows who “changed” Clara are metaphors, psychological projections of the evils of man. Clara rationalized the ‘crows’ as spirits who abducted her for misbehaving and returned her once she became a “good” child. In truth she was kidnapped probably by Von Stalk, (it’s never made clear if he’s definitely responsible). Iris feels the “imp” whenever she or another character are up to some form of mischief or another.

Having finished the book my only question is did Margarethe kill her husband or did she really flee because they thought she was a witch? I would love to know more of her backstory. It reminds me of Cora from Once Upon A Time.

Have You Read Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister by

Gregory Maguire? What did you think? Which is your favorite retelling of Cinderella? Let me Know in the Comments Below!

You can keep up with me, Noel Bleu and Blu Moon Fiction on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, GoodReads and Pinterest, or Shoot me an email @ BluMoonFiction@gmail.com