Mini-Obsession: The Disney, Pixar, Dreamworks Theory

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I’m a nerd. A Book Nerd and A Film Nerd and I am proud. That being said there are so many fantastically nerdy things happening around us at all times it’s hard to pin down one specific thing to focus on. However… Some wonderful people from the internet knew exactly what I needed and so they let their Nerd flags fly super high and created

The Disney Theory

The Pixar Theory

The Dream Works Theory

It started back in 2013, so far as I can tell, blogger John Negroni spent countless hours actively connecting the Pixar Cinematic Universe with the purpose of finding  a common thread. Below is what he discovered.

I was a child when Disney first started pointing out the hidden Easter Eggs they’d been leaving in their movies. I’d always assumed the Disneyverse  was interconnected, in games like Kingdom Hearts and in TV Shows like Once Upon A Time. It explained why we could find so many similarities within the worlds of other characters.  Especially the Disney Princesses which have their own theories. In fact The Disney Theory has way more movies connecting than Pixar does so I was pleased to find that there’d been an idea behind that as well.

The Disney Theory shows the evolution and progression of the world inside the Disney Universe, whereas the Disney Princess theory explains how and why all the Disney Princesses and their kingdoms are connected to other Disney movies.

The only Dreamworks theory i’d found had tons of plot holes, missed connections and seemed to be modeled closely after our buddies over at Pixar. But it spins an interesting tale of intellectually gifted animals and the obliteration of dragons. Though this may be a “mini-obsession” something tells me I’ll be looking further into these for some time.

The Pixar Theory has been made into a book as well as spawned a branded website.

 

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Mini-Obsession: What Dates Do They Die?

c03aacba0d4db273714ae7278d8b75a57847845150090983815.jpgI’m reading The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin, I hadn’t made it past page 35 before my obsession kicked in.

They went to a soothsayer who told them the dates of their deaths. Of all the things they could’ve chosen to ask they decided on that. 🙄

They were all so shaken no one spoke of it….Until their dad died. Then we finally get to know that each sibling asked for the date of their death and each sibling was told something dramatically different.

The book provided all of Varya’s details, January 21, 2044 – age 88. Daniel the second oldest was also provided November 24, 2006 at age 48.

That’s when things become tricky, now of course I’m sure that the book will reveal exactly when and how these siblings meet their fates but having been given the first two I wanted to know the years of the others. Simon’s obviously dies in 1982 as that’s when his section ends. He dies young but that’s all we know.

Klara admits she dies at 31 though and by using her age at the time of the reading (9 in 1969) at least we know she kicks the bucket in 1991 or maybe 1990 depending on her actual birthday…🤔

This is what I worked out so far.

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What Book Are You Presently Obsessing Over?

 

 

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Bookish Thoughts: Invisible Library Wrap-Up

20180731_1510192610916188086602074.jpgI’m a bit obsessed with The Invisible Library right now. The entire concept of a secret society traversing dimensions collecting specialized works of fiction was enough to lure me in but the story was basically as the blurb described; Sherlock Holmes with a twist of magic.

It gave me a taste of steampunk which I absolutely loved because I’m intrigued by the genre but haven’t been able to tear myself away from my normal reads to actually break into my stash of steampunk novels. I bought an anthology and what was described as a ‘must read’ for people interested in breaking into the genre.

I’m still working on fine tuning what kinds of books I truly love to read. I read most fiction, but have been known to peruse the occasional memoir. The Invisible Library was found in the Fantasy section of the bookstore.

It happens to be a Book about books, mystery and for some reason classifies as a Young Adult, with a touch of steampunk. I’ve always enjoyed Sherlock Holmes story. I also enjoy whodunnit’s (dinner theatre), clue (both the game and the movie) and suspense/thriller/horror. I was genuinely worried that the hodge-podge of things happening with the book would be overwhelming. It was pleasantly surprising that the story was cohesive and a real testament to the author.

I keep thinking about their codenames. In the book Irene mentions that the initiates get to pick her name and that Kostchei (the deathless) had chosen his name based on the fable. This makes me wonder if all the agents of  “The Library” were named after other previous book characters. So I googled….and google didn’t know.

Then I went to GoodReads…and i’m waiting for a response….

and then there’s always the twitter verse…screenshot_20180801-224534_twitter4132641945363581948.jpg

and so far no one has answered.  But, I’ll keep checking on the answer to that because I’m dying to read the story of Bradamant. I’m also curious to know which Irene she’s supposed to be. I enjoyed the fact that it was only 329 pages. I feel like my limit is approximately 600 pages but I wouldn’t read two of those kinds of books back to back.

The reviews for The Invisible Library  are mostly favorable. Some people didn’t like the blending of so many fantasy elements but the majority at least accepted the concept of alternate realms that allowed it to work.

The description for The Masked City has me drooling!!!

Irene’s mission to save Kai and avert Armageddon will take her to a dark, alternate Venice where it’s always Carnival. Here Irene will be forced to blackmail, fast talk, and fight. Or face death.

I refuse to borrow this book. I must claim it for my own!

Therefore I’ll be going back for The Masked City, The Burning Page and The Lost Plot very very soon.  I was literally about to read another Gregory Maguire book. I absolutely love his work. Just for kicks I’m working my way through a list of his work. I have to finish The Wicked Years series . Now I’m going to read The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin because the cover just popped into my head. I’ve been meaning to read this book for some time and have heard a lot about it. All seem great but I haven’t read any reviews so that I don’t have a biased opinion.

Happy Reading!

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What are you reading?

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Check out my Review for The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman click Here!

You can keep up with me, Noel Bleu and Blu Moon Fiction on FacebookTwitterInstagramGoodReads and Pinterest, or Shoot me an email @ BluMoonFiction@gmail.com

Bleu Reviews: The Invisible Library

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The Invisible Library By: Genevieve Cogman Rating: 5 out of 5

***There May Be Some Indirect Spoilers, I Try To Be As Vague As Possible ***

Another book completed to add to my 2018 Reading Challenge. After finishing Renegades by Marissa Meyer, I was looking for something different. I even considered that YA may no longer be for me.

My interests tend to linger on the more grotesque of topics and the more gore the better in my opinion.  As a result of fine tuning the specific kinds of books I like, I stumbled across this series and it just topped my list of MUST READS.

I originally discovered this book while doing a Bookstore browse and was actually pulled in by the fourth installment of the series. That book’s cover had a Great Gatsby layout that piqued my interest, but, as an avid book collector and lover of series I had to start with the first book to be sure it was worth the time.

Though still technically a YA novel, “The Invisible Library” turned out to be more exciting than it sounded. The book was full of my favorite things; an amazing creatively developed world, with well-rounded, expertly written, relatable snarky characters. A img_20180624_231004_5964887169042057646425.jpgcreative magical system that uses actual language, (both written and spoken) to thrive. Secret Societies dedicated to the procurement of specialty works of fiction, “By Any (most) Means Necessary” Alternate worlds offering various pending adventures as well as misadventures and a female protagonist, which I’m always down for.

There is even mild sexual tension between characters Irene and Kai and a possible love triangle if we are willing to make Vale a true contender for her affections. Those who enjoy a little romance to break up their action will be pleasantly occupied with the developments there. Cogman did an impressive job developing the plot.

The mystery aspects of the novel were so well conceived that the reader was gradually transported to the same conclusions the characters themselves reached around the same img_20180624_230527_3388987632588590467996.jpgtime. I will admit, on a few occasions, I even guessed at some of the scenes. A true indicator that I was connecting with the story.

The Invisible Library, was a relatively quick read and I would have finished it sooner, if not for family emergencies and a dread of finishing before I had time to buy the next book. This is one series I’m considering borrowing from the library.

I choose my fantasy mostly based on the entertainment factor,  though, a few books manage to toss in an underlying message that I have to dissect later. This book had such a quality. The nature of the library isn’t to interfere nor is it to become attached, yet in essence it’s function seems to be a contradiction.

Agents must intervene in order to intercept the works of fiction, either passively as in most missions (as explained by Irene) or through more direct methods as displayed in the story. Likewise forming attachments, at times prove useful as secrecy isn’t always best when trying to gain information.

I was satisfied with how the first book ended understanding that there is more to it since there are four completed works in this series. I love the overall concept that a secret society of librarians exist to gather books from alternate realms. The Mythos behind it’s forming and its true nature are also things I’m looking forward to learning more about. Very eager to get my hands on the next book, which the author was so kind as to include as an excerpt in the first one.

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What’s Your Favorite Book About Books?

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Bleu Reviews: Renegades

 

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Rating: 4 out of  5

I have finally read a book written by Marissa Meyer and considering the page count, I’m very proud of myself.  I fell into a reading slump during this book, and had to switch to an audio book to actually complete the novel but I finished and i’m still on track for my 2018 Reading Challenge.

Renegades by Marissa Meyer is a YA novel all about superheroes. Very much in the way of X-Men, these “prodigies” (mutants, specials whatevs) were being persecuted for their gifts and were only free of that persecution after a revolt. What would later become the villains were originally the ones willing to fight to end the system that oppressed them. As usual with these sort of things, the power went to their heads and we were faced with a decade of anarchy.

My favorite parts of this book would be the plot and underlying message the book itself conveys. In Renegades, post anarchy, the Renegades are both the police force and  the governing body. Civilization has ground to a halt and prodigies are relied on for everything. It makes me think of the Powerpuff Girls, Too Pooped to Puff  (Season 2, Episode 3) it seems the non-prodigy citizens of Gatlon have fallen into the same boat.

The worst part of the read was really just the pacing, the action scenes were fast-paced, easy to get through but the delivery of backstory  d    r     a    g    g    e    d …  and it killed me at times to read. I finally caved and hunted down an audio book on YouTube.

20180624_152315I love that the two main characters have triple identities and that you can see where at times Nova truly believes in the intent of the Renegades mission while not necessarily agreeing with their existence.

Nova was my favorite character, her inner turmoil made getting through the slower parts more enjoyable. I especially love where the first book leaves her and I’m eager to find out what happens to her next. Sketch is easily overshadowed as far as characters go though he is very well written as the “all-american” golden boy, it feels pretty cliche at times and the only thing changing that was the introduction of the Sentinel.

There are definitely a few plot twists I hadn’t seen coming, but for now I’m only finishing the series because I started it and want to know what Nova plans to do next. I did hear that this was also going to be a graphic novel. I’m much more interested in seeing what the story looks like.
 

Who’s Your Favorite Villain?

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Renegades Read Along (Chap 1 – 15)

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Currently Reading: Renegades by Marissa Meyer

I was having some trouble getting through my read of Renegades and was hoping to add some excitement in hopes of finishing the book. So this is me trying to spice things up with what will hopefully be a new permanent addition to the blog. For more on what I thought about the first fifteen chapters watch the video below!

 

 

What Do You Think of The Book So Far?

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You can keep up with me, Noel Bleu and Blu Moon Fiction on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, GoodReads and Pinterest, or Shoot me an email @ BluMoonFiction@gmail.com

Bleu Reviews: Chinese Cinderella

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Rating: 5 out of  5

I seldom read anything that is not made up. A choice that excludes news, and other great pieces of writing simply because these things actually happened. However, occasionally I find myself straying from my comfort zone to stare change in the face and to embrace something different. This time around it would be a memoir with a catchy title.

Chinese Cinderella: The True Story of an Unwanted Daughter

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Based on the life and upbringing of NY Times bestselling author Adeline Yen Mah, Chinese Cinderella,  shares her life and experiences from early childhood until around age fourteen when thanks to good fortune she is able to escape her family.

My initial thoughts were focused around how beautifully written yet highly infuriating  the story was.  I was drawn in by the title, Cinderella, being one of my favorite fairy tales and often used to describe a young woman forced into servitude of her family. I was half expecting a prince to be included and a royal ball to be her saving grace.

This tale was slightly different, still very much a heart-wrenching story of injustice. Reading this story I felt a great deal of sadness and anger on her behalf.  I found myself wishing I had a time machine, so I could go back and rescue the poor child myself.

This story reminds me of “A Child Called It”, by Dave Pelzer. Though Yen Jun-Ling isn’t adelinescleft in a shed or fed dog food, her banishment to a war torn boarding school feels comparable. She isn’t physically abused though the psychological and verbal abuse she experiences shapes her just as strongly in the end. Her familial isolation leads her towards the path of scholarship and literature and she excels despite having few people in her corner.

Her only refuge are her grandfather and aunt whom try to aide her as best they can but also become victims to Niang’s cruelty. I honestly felt both anger and sympathy for them. The once proud head of the family withered by age and illness forced to rely on his vapid son and his wicked younger second wife. I understood the hierarchy of things but still wished Aunt Baba could’ve popped Niang just once.

The book was a quick read, ending when Yen Mah was 14 and on her way to Oxford, to think that she came very close to being forced out of school and into the workforce by her father and stepmother is appalling. That she was only sent to Oxford after winning a literary competition and that even then her father decided she would go for medicine is equally disgusting.

Even though Niang was the primary villain of the book I think the true bad guy was her father. He was her FATHER for crying out loud, she was literally the fruit of his loins, yet he allowed this woman to divide his children, mistreat the originals and literally scar his last child by his first wife. Instead of holding onto her as the final memory of his late wife he treated her worse than the German Shepherd he’d purchased.

Best Part of The Book —> Her finally being free of the terrible family she had. Her second oldest brother was also a jerk. I don’t have fond thoughts of her family but luckily they believe in Karma so they’ll all be reincarnated as dung beetles.

It was a pretty interesting book, as a quick read I may add more memoirs into my collection of books to read throughout the year. I am hoping to get at least 4 non-fiction books into my completed pile before the year is out.

Name Your Favorite Memoir?

Let Me Know In The Comments Below!

You can keep up with me, Noel Bleu and Blu Moon Fiction on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, GoodReads and Pinterest, or Shoot me an email @ BluMoonFiction@gmail.com