Bleu’s Reviews: Conjure Women

Conjure Women focuses on three very different women of the same plantation. Told primarily from the perspective of Rue, daughter of esteemed conjure woman and favorite of Marse Charles Miss May Belle. Rue also happens to be trusted friend and confidant of the master’s daughter Varina. As the story swings from the past during May Belle’s reign as Queen of conjure on the plantation to present day Rue who has taken on the mantle as healer in the Resurrection – era village that is all that remains of their old home. Following the birth of “Bean”;  a child with unusual eyes, and the seasonal appearance of a traveling preacher, a sickness takes hold of the towns children. The townspeople are ready to turn their backs on Rue and towards their faith. As Rue works to find a cure, she begins a path at uncovering everyone’s secrets including her own.

Post – read I still can’t pinpoint exactly where this is located and I’m perfectly okay with that. Every main location was so well crafted I feel like I was blended into the story with them. My favorite would be Atakora’s description of the woods, the darkness of it how the fog seemed to emanate from it. The woods in post civil war village became a character in itself. I also loved how Rue interacted with the land itself, hiding coins in trees as she’d seen her mother do. How she often crouched low to the earth to pick flowers and herbs even the detail in which she described finding the herbs from different spots. I absolutely love a well built world and this book has it in spades.

The story is more about Rue than anyone else but seems to focus on Rue and how she maneuvers around other people. She is often measuring herself against her mother’s accomplishments. She feels a weighty responsible to look after the town and its children despite a clear and present threat to herself and yet she persists to ensure the people who live there are looked after and well cared for. Just as she had always served and cared for Varina throughout their upbringing. She often lets Varina lure her into mischief and I only say let because I feel like Rue at times doesn’t even attempt to speak up. The relationship she shares with Varina is a complex one that seems more maternal at times than what it truly is. The rivalries between a lot of the characters twists the theories of faith, magic and deception. What is illusion when belief becomes a tangible thing? Each of the characters in the book seem to be holding a secret and as the story progressed Atakora peeled back another layer until the final secret was brought to the light and true freedom could finally come.

 

Overall I 100% loved this book!

 

Its my first 5-star read of the year and I have loads more reading to do. As a debut novel I’d have to say Afia Atakora should be super proud of herself. Conjure Women was an amazign read. It was well written, i was into the story and genuinely felt something from start to finish. My goodreads feed was flooded with updates and I was able to finish this beauty in about three days.

 

I will be doing a live zoom discussion with #ALLTHINGSLIT Book Club to discuss Conjure Women be sure to check my social media for more information about that ❤ Can’t wait to chat with everyone soon.

 

What Did You Think Of Conjure Women?

Leave A Comment Below!

You can keep up with me, Noel Bleu and Blu Moon Fiction on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, GoodReads and Pinterest, or Shoot me an email @ BluMoonFiction@gmail.com

Harriet’s BookShop Opening!

 

I’d walked into Harriet’s bookshop on Saturday to the sound of African drums and a historic tale of Henry’s freedom box. The mixed crowd that spanned age groups 20200201_1157026340525499668199545.jpgsqueezed into the cozy space of Harriet’s to check out some books and experience a little of the culture this new bookshop is cultivating.

I enjoy a good bookstore. In fact I joke, every time a new bookstore opens a fan girl gets her wings, so my excitement was piqued when I got the Facebook event update that a new bookstore would be opening on 258 E Girard Ave.

Owned by local writer, Jeannine A. Cook, the journey from vision to Harriet’s wasn’t an easy road. She’d overcome the tragic set-back of losing her first bookstore 20200201_1151514109939006323868881.jpgto a fire.

I’m gonna be honest here guys. I’m a west Philly girl through and through so I’m not that familiar with the area. I can tell you that the bookstore offers a variety of books written by black authors and catered to people of color.

My favorite feature was the nook by the register. It’s set up with art work and flanked by gorgeous bookshelves. The children’s books also found right by the counter feature a variety of books for children. I even picked up one for baby Bleu.

I’ll absolutely be heading back to Harriet’s. I have a few books on my tbr that I spotted on her shelves. If you’re looking for a few new reads head over too, tell me what you think of the nook. 😁 Head over to the Blu Moon Fiction Facebook page to check out some of the books I’ll be adding to my #BookCollection!

 

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I caught up with one local shopper who stocked up on tons of books for his kids. His daughter is an avid reader. 🙂 

 

Have You Been Down To Harriet’s? What’d You Think? Leave A Comment Below!

 

You can keep up with me, Noel Bleu and Blu Moon Fiction on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, GoodReads and Pinterest, or Shoot me an email @ BluMoonFiction@gmail.com